Tag: communication

4 Red Flags of a Relationship Going Downhill

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Valentine’s Day is around the corner. It is suppose to be happy times for you and your partner however, things are going worse and worse day to day. That love you had towards your partner is becoming annoyance, hate, anger… dead end

 

Is it a dead end to your relationship or can you save it? Try exploring these 4 red flags and if all or most apply to you, I suggest contacting a therapist to give you a helping hand.

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1. Lack of Communication

Do you feel your conversations are becoming shorter and shorter? That’s not a good sign. Here are some things to look for when you and your partner are exchanging words.
a) Bitter Language: This is when unconsciously or consciously you or your partner use words that are offensive or words that project accusation and criticism.
b). Negativity: This occurs when majority of your talks are negative. You only speak to one another when there is something negative to point out. You only see the flaws of your partner and fail to recognize the positive traits and actions.
c). Not Letting Go: You hold on to arguments and negative experiences however, you tend to forget the positive and happy moments in your relationship. When the right time comes, you use the past against your partner. Read More

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Effects of Domestic Violence on Children

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Watch this short video to learn about the effects of domestic violence on children. Understand the signs and symptoms children may exhibit, what type of support they need, and how to prevent trauma.

 

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Symptoms of Depression

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Symptoms of Depression

Depression varies from person to person, but there are some common signs and symptoms. Read below to learn about some signs of depression and so that you know when it’s time to seek help.

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or empty mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities that were once enjoyed
  • Decreased energy, fatigue, being “slowed down”
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions
  • Insomnia, early morning awakening or oversleeping
  • Appetite and/or weight loss, or overeating and weight gain
  • Thoughts of death or suicide attempts
  • Restlessness, irritability
  • Persistent physical symptoms that do not respond to treatment, such as headaches, digestive disorders and chronic pain

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Depression makes it tough to function and enjoy life like you once did. Just getting through the day can be overwhelming. But no matter how hopeless you feel, you can get better. Understanding the signs, symptoms, causes, and treatment of depression is the first step to overcoming the problem.

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Rise To The Challenges

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Hello,

I am a psychotherapist providing therapy to Individuals, Couples, Families, and Adolescents in Los Angeles area. I can help you cope with life’s challenges such as, death of a loved one, domestic violence, addiction, family/relationship problems, marital conflict, infertility, abuse, chronic illness, unemployment, etc..

My goal is to assist you in your journey of working towards your potential and improving your well-being, as well as build on your strengths and attain the personal growth you are committed to accomplishing. It is my passion to help individuals move from suffering and hardship to a place of happiness and comfort.

I provide a caring, safe and professional environment for my patients where everything is kept confidential. My experience and areas of specialty include but is not limited to the treatment of depression, anxiety, trauma, relationship issues, addiction issues and, anger management.

If you feel that I may be a good fit for you, contact me to schedule a session by clicking on the link below. I look forward to working with you.

Sincerely Yours,

Shushan

Happiness

http://therapists.psychologytoday.com/rms/name/Shushan_Khachatryan_MFTI_Encino_California_210953

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Basic Principles of Good Parent/Child Communication

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• Let the child know that you are interested and involved and that you will help when needed.
• Turn off the television or put the newspaper down when your child wants to converse.
• Avoid taking a telephone call when the child has something important to tell you.
• Unless other people are specifically meant to be included, hold conversations in privacy. The best communication between you and the child will occur when others are not around.
• Embarrassing the child or putting him on the spot in front of others will lead only to resentment and hostility, not good communication.
• Don’t tower over your child. Physically get down to the child’s level then talk.
• If you are very angry about a behavior or an incident, don’t attempt communication until you regain your cool, because you cannot be objective until then. It is better to stop, settle down, and talk to the child later.
• If you are very tired, you will have to make an extra effort to be an active listener. Genuine active listening is hard work and is very difficult when your mind and body are already tired.
• Listen carefully and politely. Don’t interrupt the child when he is trying to tell his story. Be as courteous to your child as you would be to your best friend.
• Don’t be a wipe-out artist, unraveling minor threads of a story and never allowing the child’s own theme to develop. This is the parent who reacts to the incidentals of a message while the main idea is list: i.e., the child starts to tell about what happened and the parent says, “I don’t care what they are doing, but you had better not be involved in anything like that.”
• Don’t ask why, but do ask what happened.
• If you have knowledge of the situation, confront the child with the information that you know or have been told.
• Keep adult talking (“You’ll talk when I’m finished.” “I know what’s best for you.” “Just do what I say and that will solve the problem”), preaching and moralizing to a minimum because they are not helpful in getting communication open and keeping it open.
• Don’t use put-down words or statements: dumb, stupid, lazy: “Stupid, that makes no sense at all” or “What do you know, you’re just a child.”
• Assist the child in planning some specific steps to the solution.
• Show that you accept the child himself, regardless of what he has or has not done.
• Reinforce the child for keeping communication open. Do this by accepting him and praising his efforts to communicate.

Words of Encouragement and Praise
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